Four Foods I want to Make in their Home Countries – Part 2

 

As soon as I got done the first part about food I want to make, I immediately began part two because… well… I’m hungry now and far too poor/impatient to actually do any of this. Take a look at the next four foods I’d love to learn how to make in their home countries and begin salivating with me.

Oh… and probably check out part 3 which will likely follow this incredibly shortly!

Gumbo – Louisiana, USA

I have made gumbo many a time but no matter how great I think it is, I know it doesn’t hold a candle to the ones served up down in the bayou. To be fair, gumbo isn’t that much different then soup but it’s the dirtying up of the vegetables that adds the extra element that makes it unique. Just like making chilli or some sort of marinade for ribs or chicken wings, gumbo recipes are heavily guarded secrets – so wouldn’t it be fantastic to learn some of the tips from the pros?

Bread – France

The French have a sensational culinary history but it’s their baked goods that seem to be in a realm of their own. Fresh, hot bread can be made by anyone with a bread maker or the patience to make it themselves in the oven, but I’d like to see how the expert French bakers, the ones who spend their lives making it in a wood stove, do it. Then maybe I can come back home and put everyone else to shame with their store bought stale loaves.

Really, any of this would be amazeballs

Really, any of this would be amazeballs

Tom Yum Soup – Thailand

Thai food is another one of those types of cuisine that I really have no clue which one I would prefer over another but seeing as everyone would likely say pad thai or spring rolls, I’m going to go with my personal favourite – Tom Yum soup. It’s a spicy, sour soup that warms the soul and has more distinct flavours than my tastebuds know what to do with. I’ve never attempted to make it at home as it feels like sacrilege, but if I had the right pointers, maybe I would.

Curry – India

There are so many curry dishes I enjoy that I really have no idea which one to start with. I think what I would like most to get out of learning from the curry professionals is what goes into making a good curry base? I recently started making my own pastes rather than buying them and I’ve noticed the quality in the cooking has skyrocketed to the point of I almost don’t feel any need to go out for it anymore – the only thing holding me back is an inability to make proper naan. Such is life…

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