5 days in Sicily

Siracusa (2 nights)

In ancient days, Siracusa (or Syracuse) was a vital town that at just one occasion or another fell under the control of the many totally different rulers, together with Greece, the Roman Republic and therefore the Byzantine Empire. Today, this stunning town contains several spectacular ruins from all of these empires, together with the Temple of Apollo, which can be the oldest Greek temple in Sicily, a Roman amphitheater as well as a large Greek amphitheater that was carven out of rock. There are several buildings from the medieval period in Siracusa, together withthe Palazzo Montalto. Exploring the various ancient and medieval structures in this area can simply keep you busy for 2 days.

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Taormina (1 night)

The next stop on your Sicily itinerary is Taormina, that could be a fashionable resort that sits high on top of the Mediterranean Sea on Sicily’s east coast. This city contains varied Greek and Roman structures. One of Taormina’s — and Sicily’s — most noted buildings is its Greek Theater,that continues to be in use these days. This building offers guests views of each the ocean and Mt. Etna volcano. Taormina additionally boasts a medieval quarter. And when you’re tired of visiting ruins, you can always walk or take a cable car to one of Taormina’s stunning beaches.

Cefalu (1 night)

Cefalu is a popular tourist destination that is located on the Tyrrhenian Sea on Sicily’s north coast. Like many of Sicily’s other towns, Cefalu is filled with a mixture of ancient and medieval structures and influences. One of its most famous structures is its Duomo, a grand two-towered Norman Cathedral that dates back to approximately 1131. The interior of this cathedral is covered in beautiful mosaics. If you’re an active traveler, you’ll enjoy hiking up to the top of La Rocca and checking out the remains of the Cefalu Castle, which dates back to the 13th and 14th Centuries. This is also an excellent place to enjoy spectacular views of the surrounding area.

 

Palermo (1 night)

Your final stop are a return to Palermo, where you’ll be able to end your trip to Sicily by trying the foods you would possibly have missed on the rest of your whirlwind journey. Head over to the open-air markets and check out the fare offered by the road vendors, like arancini, that are fried rice balls, or the pizza-like sfincione. A visit to Palermo’s Regional archeological Museum, that contains artifacts dating from prehistoric times to the present, is arguably one among the most effective places to finish your exploration of Sicily and to learn what has made this unique island what it is today.


Image by gareth1953 Cataract Creating ChaosLuigi Strano under CC License.

 

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